Category Archives: Art

Love Up-Cycled: Handmade objects from the heart

Up-cycled Leather Feather Earrings by Nadine Schmoll of Spitfire Designs.

Up-cycled leather feather earrings by Nadine Schmoll of Spitfire Designs.

If you haven’t heard of it, which I hadn’t until recently, Reverse Garbage is a wonderful non-profit initiative in Woolloongabba that collects industrial discards and sells them for cheap, saving both the environment and the customer. Items sold can be used for art, jewellery making, set designing and many other creative endeavours.

This month Reverse Garage is holding a Valentines-themed exhibition in its warehouse – Love Up-cycled: Handmade objects from the heart. The exhibition will showcase 25 local Brisbane artists who up-cycle. Like recycle, but better. They’ll be presenting a range of love-themed gifts in preparation for Valentine’s Day. Or you could just treat yourself; you don’t need a relationship to buy jewellery, right? The exhibition runs for three weeks, but the free opening event is on Saturday the 8th of February, from 6:30-8pm. Brisbane duo The Phoncurves will be playing, there’ll be late-night shopping, free snacks (free snacks!) and a cash bar.

Nadine Schmoll, the face behind Spiritfire Designs, is one of the artists exhibiting at Love Up-cycled, and she’s also Reverse Garbage’s Workshop Co-ordinator and Board Director. Nadine’s been a long-time customer at Reverse Garbage and she finds salvaged materials inspire the art she creates.

“They set the framework for my art to occur. Using salvaged materials means I need to let the process be guided by what I have available to me at the time, as I try to use as many up-cycled elements as possible. The actual process of finding materials is also very inspiring – it may spark an idea, a colour theme or experimentation,” she said.

“As a workshop facilitator, I am also very passionate about educating and inspiring others to re-use in a creative way. I hope that by setting an example, I can inspire others to make small changes to reduce their own impact on the environment.”

At the exhibition Spiritfire Designs will be selling leather feather earrings, mini dream catchers, chandelier crystal & fabric flower hairpins and bow ties, all made from re-used materials.

Up-cycled dreamcatchers by Nadine Schmoll of Spitfire Designs.

Up-cycled dreamcatchers by Nadine Schmoll of Spitfire Designs.

Self-taught artist and veteran user of salvaged materials, Samantha Gilkes of Jetta’s Nest will be exhibiting at her fifth Reverse Garbage exhibition. Samantha’s been re-using materials for 15 years now, aided by her carpenter husband and a friend who owns a mobile saw-mill.

“I first started using salvaged wood pieces to paint on after painting a mural on a wooden dining table for a friend.  The wood I used was quite hard for me to source then but after meeting my husband it became something I had ready access to so I stuck with it,” she said.

Jetta’s Nest will be selling a number of salvaged wood wearable art jewellery pieces, including brooches and necklaces as well as cards made from recycled card stock.

If you miss the opening, the exhibition will run from February 8-28, Monday to Saturday from 9-5 at Reverse Emporium, Reverse Garbage, 20 Burke St, Woolloongabba.

WORDS by LUCY SMITH

Advertisements

Queensland Academy for Creative Industries TRYPTICH 2013

QACI1

Little is known about the group of talented students that inhabit the hallways of the Queensland Academy for Creative Industries (QACI). Every year towards the end of the year, QACI holds an event that celebrates the talent of the students in their final year of their International Baccalaureate (IB) schooling. The current Visual Arts showcase allows the public to see into the world of each art student through a formal gallery setting.

The beautifully lit space within the entrance of QACI is separated into a series of cubicles, one per student, to display a collective of their finest work. There are a total of 52 students represented in this year’s cohort, each with outstanding work on display. The diverse outcomes that these students have produced through a range of different technologies and mediums represent the school’s aim to be a world-class learning environment for the aspirational creative generation.  There is definitely something to suit everybody’s taste with not only paintings, sculpture and photography, but also fashion, film and installation.

As the gallery is set up to divide each students’ work into their own mini-space, the viewer is confronted with each private world, one at a time. Every time one enters the next space, a new theme and subject matter is brought to the viewer and each body of work is as confronting as the next. Some artists have chosen to look at extreme obscurities in life and others have chosen to delve into their own identity to find some meaning in their own lives. Whatever the young artists have chosen, the work that is produced is nothing short of amazing, below are a few examples. Many of the photos taken are not an accurate representation of some bodies of work as many of these pieces involve an extremely experiential aspect to them.

RUMINATIONS – Sarah Laird. This body of work as described by the artist herself “mediates the concept of introspection”.

RUMINATIONS – Sarah Laird. This body of work as described by the artist herself “mediates the concept of introspection”.

Ambiguous Insouciant Harmony – Chelsea Li

Ambiguous Insouciant Harmony – Chelsea Li

Belonging to the Different – Nissa Ryan

Belonging to the Different – Nissa Ryan

Detail of Persistence from Identity: Heritage – Lucy McIntyre. “Showing the struggle and pain of societies’ bounds.”

Detail of Persistence from Identity: Heritage – Lucy McIntyre. “Showing the struggle and pain of societies’ bounds.”

LINEAR – Kim Sellwood. The lightbox titled Elicited represents the concept of emotion in the world through flashing lights. With some bulbs flashing on and off, being that one person could be emotionally well, but can turn off just as the next person has an opposite reaction.

LINEAR – Kim Sellwood. The lightbox titled Elicited represents the concept of emotion in the world through flashing lights. With some bulbs flashing on and off, being that one person could be emotionally well, but can turn off just as the next person has an opposite reaction.

Vicarious from Third Eye - Olivia Moore

Vicarious from Third Eye – Olivia Moore

Detail of sculpture from Blurred - Ruby Black

Detail of sculpture from Blurred – Ruby Black

Apoptosis – Charlotte Mungomery.  This body of work is centred on the notion of “decay and impermanence”. The experiential qualities of this collective of work is indescribable and must be experienced in person. An intriguing synergy is created within this space through the combination of film, sculpture, photography and pattern.

Apoptosis – Charlotte Mungomery.
This body of work is centred on the notion of “decay and impermanence”. The experiential qualities of this collective of work is indescribable and must be experienced in person. An intriguing synergy is created within this space through the combination of film, sculpture, photography and pattern.

Organic forms in resin, backlit series from the body of work titled, Repetition as a model of change – Felix Cehak. Resin cast of fungal forms, mounted on opaque acrylic within particle board box.

Organic forms in resin, backlit series from the body of work titled, Repetition as a model of change – Felix Cehak. Resin cast of fungal forms, mounted on opaque acrylic within particle board box.

This is only a small selection from the broad range of student work on offer for viewing at QACI. So if you are a Brisbanite with a thirst for art then head over to the Queensland Academy for Creative Industries.

The exhibition will be open to the public until November 8th. Address for The Queensland Academy for Creative Industries is: 61 Musk Avenue, Kelvin Grove

www.qaci.eq.edu.au

WORDS by DENNY DUAN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twice Shy + Foxsmith = Shy Fox

BuffaloMountainsSeana Seeto is a local freelance graphic designer who makes expressive, bold and colourful art. She describes herself as shy, but her creative collective Twice Shy and clothing/art store Shy Fox are anything but.

Seana founded Twice Shy with her uni friends Laura Packer and Nic Fornasier as a way to collaborate their different strengths in design, animation and film. With Twice Shy, Seana freelances for a bunch of Brisbane bands including Foxsmith, Mega Ogre and Little Buffalo.

Her clothing and art label Shy Fox started up earlier this year, and thus far sells handmade pocket tees, screen printed t-shirts, painted skate decks and prints. She began the store with Charlie from Foxsmith, and the name was a mash-up between their two projects. Shy Fox has a stall at the Young Designer’s Markets in Southbank on the first Sunday of each month.

FuFoxDeckSeana loves the process of turning pencil and paper into a digital illustration. She generally hand draws all of her work, scans it and goes “crazy in Photoshop with my beloved Wacom tablet.”

She’s had a passion for drawing since her childhood.

“One of my earliest memories is winning a Hungry Jack’s voucher for my crayon drawing of Simba from The Lion King – I think this is still a crowning achievement of my life!” Seana said.

Seana long harboured a desire to be an animator, but believing herself to be too impatient, she studied Communication Design at university. Doing so, she realised she wanted to merge her love for illustration with graphic design.

“So I did just that, and worked on developing my style to what it is now… a mix of weird characters, vibrant colours and textures.”

The cosy size of Brisbane’s creative scene has its challenges, but Seana is grateful for its tight-knit nature.

“I do like how there is always a probability of two-degrees of connection between everyone!”

And what are her plans for the future?

“Just working on expanding Shy Fox with some new designs and exciting new ideas, as well as keepin’ on with my band artwork. I’m also working on putting out a new zine of characters I’ve been creating lately. And I’m always on the lookout for new projects to have fun with!”

 

WORDS by LUCY SMITH

Light Sensitive

Light Sensitive

Southside Tea Room is one of the pioneering cafes that are making Brisbane suburbs livable and loveable again. If pro coffee, cake, chips and dip, a cocktail or home made ice blocks enjoyed in a ‘so kitschy it’s good’ setting, hasn’t been reason enough to make your way to Morningside, then the opening night of Light Sensitive, Southside Tearoom’s first photography showcase should be!

Lucinda Wolber is curating another show for the café owned and run by Patience Hodgson and John Patterson of indie rock fame, The Grates. An artist in her own right, Lucy has once again channeled her creativity to deliver a sophisticated exhibit of engaging imagery from eight Brisbane photographers.

Lawrence Arnold

Lawrence Arnold

Being lucky enough to steal a sneak peak of the works that will be on display and for sale  – you will be won over by the eclectic mix of talent on show.

Exploring the concept of identity through figurative narratives, photographers Dominique Elliot, Elisabeth Willis, Hamish Lang, Chris Proud, Lawrie Van Hoff, Brendon Grove, Lawrence Arnold and Pierce Eldridge have captured their personal interpretation of the subject matter, each with their unique approach to their art form.

Elisabeth Willis

Elisabeth Willis

Join us this Friday the 2nd of August from 6pm for a stellar opening night event.

Even though your GPS might have to spell out Wynnum Road because the word is so foreign, it’s actually just around the bend from Wooloongabba.

The duration of the show will run for 2 weeks and is not to be missed.

Light Sensitive

Photography exhibition curated by Lucinda Wolber

Facebook Event

Opening night 6pm

Friday 2nd August 2013

Southside Tearoom

639 Wynnum Road, Morningside

WORDS by ALEX WINTERS